LegumVox

ONLINE VIOLENCE


As the internet becomes a progressively essential part of human existence and a judgmental space for declassed populations to make their voices heard, a woman’s inability to feel safe online is a hindrance to her freedom, as well as to her basic human rights. Yet the problem of online violence and harassment is often missed in discussions of violence against women.

“Just like the global, strengthen the effort to end violence against women broadly, attaining online safety for women takes multiple, concerted strategies by various actors,”
-Jac sm Kee.

Governments require to include online violence against women as part of their plans to resolve violence against women as a whole and see this as a larger hindrance for women and girls in exercising the full span of their human rights. Social media companies need to take proactive measures to ensure their space does not enable these acts. Women and girls have the right to live in a world where they are free from any discrimination and abuse. We recognize that online violence is a cause of deep-seated gender inequality and just one more way that women and girls are declining their human rights. That’s why we support amnesty international India engaged in tackling online violence – from reporting online harassment cases to providing counseling and training. We cannot draw an outline of online and offline violence. We all must request a better Internet where everyone – women, youth, and other people can make their voices heard free from violence. And while women’s rights activists have a way for how to get there, it will require action and cooperation from governments, companies, and from, individuals.

“In a world where we seamlessly steer the online and the offline every day – often being in both positions at the same time – it is crucial for us to address the violence that women face in both kingdoms. Online violence is real violence,”
-Bishakha Datta
“Online violence avert women are opposed to expression of gender discrimination and inequality that exists offline. Online, it becomes intensify,”
-APC

We need to highlight online violence because it limits our right to free and full involvement, our freedom of expression and our right to safety and to privacy. The first step to direct online violence against women is to concede that it is a legitimate and harmful display of gender-based violence.

“Individual women who experience online abuse interpret that online violence is real violence, but very often their peers, friends, or families don’t,”
-Datta.

Sometimes it’s laughed off. Some families stop girls and women from accessing the internet if they complain of violence, so they don’t tell their families. This is similar to stopping girls at home for their own ‘safety’ or stopping their mobility in the name of protecting them Addressing online violence will require collective efforts from individuals, corporations, and governments.

“Just like the global, strengthen the effort to end violence against women broadly, attaining online safety for women takes multiple, concerted strategies by various actors,”
-Jac sm Kee.

Governments require to include online violence against women as part of their plans to resolve violence against women as a whole and see this as a larger hindrance for women and girls in exercising the full span of their human rights. Social media companies need to take proactive measures to ensure their space does not enable these acts. Women and girls have the right to live in a world where they are free from any discrimination and abuse. We recognize that online violence is a cause of deep-seated gender inequality and just one more way that women and girls are declining their human rights. That’s why we support amnesty international India engaged in tackling online violence – from reporting online harassment cases to providing counseling and training. We cannot draw an outline of online and offline violence. We all must request a better Internet where everyone – women, youth, and other people can make their voices heard free from violence. And while women’s rights activists have a way for how to get there, it will require action and cooperation from governments, companies, and from, individuals.


“We need recognition of online violence as real violence, and we need to deal with violence without creating hindrance in women’s freedoms. We need policies that depend on the actual harms that women face online,”
-Bishakha Datta.



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